Getting the Flower Farm Up and Running

tansy

tansy

I’ve been a business owner. I made a decent living carting my beadwork throughout Virginia every fall for eight or so years. I enjoyed meeting the people who loved and collected my work, but giving up my fall weekends (my favorite time of year) to stand behind a booth for two days was not a highlight.

So as I look at the fields of ferns and flowers, I’m considering the potential business side of the flower farm. It’s obvious that the “flower lady” who lived here before dried flowers for sale. There are rows upon rows of nails tacked into the ceiling and walls of the barn where she sold her goods. (She also sold pick-your-own flowers, but I’m too afraid of insurance liabilities to go that route.)

So to get the flower business up and running baby step by baby step, I spent about an hour cutting tansy and goldenrod to dry. I pulled the foliage from the stems, cut them to length, wrapped a bundle with a rubberband, and slipped an opened paperclip through the band. This creates a perfect little hook to add the flowers to the walls to dry.

goldenrod

goldenrod

I also picked some Queen Anne’s Lace, which I’m trying to press. How I have lived my entire life without buying a flower press is beyond me (I’ve dried flowers since I was a little girl), but if I keep with this, I’ll have to make a press. I think Queen Anne’s Lace flowers look like snowflakes. I can imagine using them to decorate handmade cards and other seasonal items.

I’m already scoping out the hydrangeas and little blue wildflowers.

No, I won’t retire on dried flowers, but if I sell a few at a farmers market or craft show, I might cover the cost of the entry fee and next year’s seeds.

Looks like I may have to hit the road again in the fall… maybe for just a weekend or two… – Stacey Morgan Smith

queen anne's lace

queen anne's lace

*** This personal blog is comprised solely of the opinions, views, projects, and travels of its author, Stacey Morgan Smith. She is lucky enough to have loving family and friends whom she drags along with her on her adventures and whom she puts to work on her little farm. She uses this blog to help promote living in the mountains of the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, from Roanoke to the Potomac River.**

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